Infinity Imagined
Multicellular Organic
Neural Network
Lives in Nitrogen-Oxygen Atmosphere
270 K - 300 K
Eats, Breathes, Thinks, Creates
When we speak of Nature it is wrong to forget that we are ourselves a part of Nature. We ought to view ourselves with the same curiosity and openness with which we study a tree, the sky or a thought, because we too are linked to the entire universe.
The atoms of the earth are formed inside of stars. Nothing really dies, everything is transformed.
thebrightorion:

Rosette Nebula
Stardust
thenewenlightenmentage:

NGC 7023: The Iris Nebula 
Image Credit & Copyright: Jimmy Walker
Explanation: These clouds of interstellar dust and gas have blossomed 1,300 light-years away in the fertile star fields of the constellation Cepheus. Sometimes called the Iris Nebula, NGC 7023 is not the only nebula in the sky to evoke the imagery of flowers, though. Still, this deep telescopic view shows off the Iris Nebula’s range of colors and symmetries in impressive detail. Within the Iris, dusty nebular material surrounds a hot, young star. The dominant color of the brighter reflection nebula is blue, characteristic of dust grains reflecting starlight. Central filaments of the dusty clouds glow with a faint reddish photoluminesence as some dust grains effectively convert the star’s invisible ultraviolet radiation to visible red light. Infrared observations indicate that this nebula may contain complex carbon molecules known as PAHs. The pretty blue petals of the Iris Nebula span about six light-years.
You are immortal; you’ve existed for billions of years in different manifestations, because you are Life, and Life cannot die. You are in the trees, the butterflies, the fish, the air, the moon, the sun. Wherever you go, you are there, waiting for yourself.
sci-universe:

"When we look out into space, we are looking into our own origins, because we are truly children of the stars." — Brian Cox
Nothing ever exists entirely alone; everything is in relation to everything else.
ohstarstuff:

The Cassini spacecraft looks down on the north pole of Saturn. The scene is serene only from a distance—raging storms are clearly visible in the atmosphere. In this image you can even make out Saturn’s hexagonal storm. The hexagonal vortex is about 20,000 miles (30,000 km) across and is a jet stream made up of 200 mph winds (322 km/h) surrounding a huge storm, Scientists have not found another weather feature exactly like this anywhere in the solar system. 
(Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / processed by Bill Dunford) 
astronomicalwonders:

The Beautiful Rings of Saturn

The Saturn system reveals tantalizing vistas. NASA’s robotic spacecraft named Cassini carries with it 12 instruments designed to take precise measurements of Saturn and its surroundings, including Titan, other icy moons, and the rings, as well as the magnetic environment.
For many of us, however, the images are what put us there, at Saturn, almost a billion miles away from home. Some of those images unveil overwhelming beauty. Others show tricks of light and seemingly magical oddities. Some reveal events from the distant past that have been preserved for eons, while other views depict processes that are changing now, like live news.
Credit: NASA/Cassini
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